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Learning Language with a St. Patrick's Day Rainbow

submitted by kidspeak

In March we celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, but what does this mean for our kids? Rainbows, four- leaf clovers, pots of gold, leprechauns and more! Here is a fun rainbow activity for teachers, therapists (both speech and occupational) and families to work on many language concepts, fine motor skills, sensory exploration as well as to help prepare them for this upcoming fun day with friends!
Materials
-Picture of a rainbow - I printed mine on cardstock for a sturdier surface
-Pom poms
-Sequins
-Foam stickers
-Feathers
-Jewels
-Glue


Cooking with Love

submitted by kidspeak

Whether you celebrate Valentine’s Day or not, February is a great time to focus on the concept of “love.” One way to do this is through something that we all love --- FOOD! Cooking with your child works on so many language concepts such as nouns, verbs, modifiers, following directions, sequencing and more! This week we want to give you some ideas on how to increase your child’s vocabulary, their ability to show love and of course loving food.
Vocabulary


Our (Speech-Inspired) Favorite Things!

submitted by kidspeak

With Valentine’s Day approaching, “love is in the air”. So we wanted to share with you some of the things that we LOVE………
Our five favorite toys that help elicit speech and language for little ones:
1. Bubbles
http://www.amazon.com/Little-Kids-Inc-093539001594-Original/dp/B00000K16...
2. Music
http://kidspeakdallas.com/products-page/songs/kidspeak-turbo-learning-pa...
3. Books
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/u/childrens-books-kids-books/379003144


Social Language through Valentine's Day crafts

submitted by kidspeak

At KidSpeak we love art for many reasons. The kiddos love it, it keeps them enaged and it addresses a variety of different skills such as: fine motor, visual spatial, social communication (requesting, taking turns, asking for help) and so much more. Here are two of our favorite Valentine’s art activities to get you in the spirit: “Heart Marble Art” and “Eye Dropper Heart Art.”
Heart Marble Art
Materials:
-cardstock
-crayons/markers
-scissors
-pan
-paint
-marbles


Meet the Halloween Fairy

submitted by kidspeak

Halloween is coming up quick which means there will be lots of CANDY in your house very soon! Some children can’t eat candy due to allergies and special diets and others can eat candy, but as parents, you may try to limit the amount they eat. If this is the case for your family, you just might find the “Halloween Fairy” to be your new BFF. Here are a few ideas on how to use the “Halloween Fairy”:
1. All of the Candy


Tantrums - What to do?

submitted by kidspeak

“My child tantrums every time I take away his favorite toy. What can I do?”
There are many ways we can tackle this situation. Today we want to address two different ways, teaching your child how to use the language, “mad” and “no.”


The Importance of Eye Contact

submitted by kidspeak

“My child doesn’t look at us when he talks, what can we do to help him?”


Preparing for School

submitted by kidspeak

The 2013 - 2014 school year is just around the corner and it’s almost time for us to get back in the school mindset and begin preparing for the fall. We want to share links to our previous school-inspired blogs to help your family prepare your child for their new school, new classroom, new teacher or new friends. We wish everyone the best of luck and loads of fun for the 2013-2014 school year!
For Professionals: 10 Tips for Communicating with Teachers: www.autismspot.com/blog/Professionals-%E2%80%93-Ten-Tips-Communicating-T...


Strategies for Learning Turn Taking

submitted by kidspeak

Turn taking is one social communication and play skill that can be very difficult for kids with language delays, language disorders, autism and other special needs. It’s a wonderful skill to work on during therapy sessions, throughout your child’s school day and while at home. Sometimes it can be difficult to know where to start.
Here are a few steps that you can follow to help your child begin to understand turn taking as well as to take turns with friends and family.
Step One: You will need a “wait” visual.


What did you do over the summer?

submitted by kidspeak

“What did you do over the summer?” This is probably the last question on your mind right now that summer has just begun, but it will be the most popular question come August and September.
Remembering past events and talking about the past can be one of the most difficult things for children on the spectrum, with ADHD, with language disorders and language delays. Creating a “My Summer Book” is a fun and easy way to work on this skill throughout your summer as well as to prepare for the question, “What did you do over the summer?”


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