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Preparing for School

submitted by kidspeak

The 2013 - 2014 school year is just around the corner and it’s almost time for us to get back in the school mindset and begin preparing for the fall. We want to share links to our previous school-inspired blogs to help your family prepare your child for their new school, new classroom, new teacher or new friends. We wish everyone the best of luck and loads of fun for the 2013-2014 school year!
For Professionals: 10 Tips for Communicating with Teachers: www.autismspot.com/blog/Professionals-%E2%80%93-Ten-Tips-Communicating-T...


Strategies for Learning Turn Taking

submitted by kidspeak

Turn taking is one social communication and play skill that can be very difficult for kids with language delays, language disorders, autism and other special needs. It’s a wonderful skill to work on during therapy sessions, throughout your child’s school day and while at home. Sometimes it can be difficult to know where to start.
Here are a few steps that you can follow to help your child begin to understand turn taking as well as to take turns with friends and family.
Step One: You will need a “wait” visual.


What did you do over the summer?

submitted by kidspeak

“What did you do over the summer?” This is probably the last question on your mind right now that summer has just begun, but it will be the most popular question come August and September.
Remembering past events and talking about the past can be one of the most difficult things for children on the spectrum, with ADHD, with language disorders and language delays. Creating a “My Summer Book” is a fun and easy way to work on this skill throughout your summer as well as to prepare for the question, “What did you do over the summer?”


Top 10 Speech and Language Toys for Little Ones

submitted by kidspeak

With all the new fangled gadgets and gizmos, iPhones and iPads and Legos galore, we thought we’d go back to the basics and share with you some of our favorite toys for little ones. The list is endless but we narrowed ours down to a few things that not only we love, but that kiddos love as well. You can facilitate some great communication interactions and also work on some other important skills and your child won’t even realize that they are “working” on their development. Here are a few of our favs and why we love them:
1. Bubbles


St. Patrick's Day Fun

submitted by kidspeak

Leprechauns! Shamrocks! Rainbows! Pots of gold! Green drinks! Green parades! St. Patrick’s Day is just around the corner. St. Patrick’s Day is a different holiday from what most of our kids are used to. It’s harder to understand but is still a lot of fun! You don’t typically get or give presents. You don’t have an egg hunt. You probably don’t have a big family dinner. As we get older it becomes a more important social holiday. So how do we work on St. Patrick’s Day now so that our kids are ready for all the social implications of St. Patrick’s Day when they are older?


Teaching Body Parts

submitted by kidspeak

“Point to your nose.”
“Where are your eyes?”
“Show me your feet.”


How to Teach Protesting

submitted by kidspeak

Protesting “no” is a skill that sometimes can be difficult for children with language disorders. Instead of using their words they may:
1. Push objects or people away
2. Throw objects
3. Cry/scream
Here are a few steps you can follow to help your child protest “no”:
Step one: You will need a visual of “no”.


Social Skills With Holiday Collages

submitted by kidspeak
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Spin into Thanksgiving

submitted by kidspeak
Photobucket

Thanksgiving is a time for family, food and fun! A great way to enjoy the holidays while working on social communication is by playing games. Give your tummy a break from turkey overload and fill your plate playing this enjoyable holiday themed activity.

Materials:


Teaching the Concept of Being Thankful

submitted by kidspeak

“I am thankful for my family!”
“I am thankful for my friends!”
“I am thankful for my dog Landry!”
Thanksgiving is the time that we express how thankful we are for people and things in our lives. This may be a difficult skill for our kids with autism spectrum disorders….to understand what “thankful” means and to understand what/who they are thankful for. Here are a few different ideas to help your child understand what is means to be thankful:
Preschoolers and Kindergartners:


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