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Help! I Have A Picky Eater

submitted by dramberbrooks

This is a common thing among children of all ages and many parents are told this is normal. We cannot expect children to appreciate a 5-course meal, but we can expect them to eat more than those 5-10 foods. I like to call it the “Mc Nugget Diet”, it sounds funny but it’s true. We wonder why our kids will only eat nuggets, fries, chips, pasta, and bread. Many times I see children that are “picky eaters” and they come in with other symptoms too that may include poor sleep, excessive gas, bloating, constipation, food allergies, eczema and behavior problems. How is this linked?


Cholesterol Deficiencies and Autism

submitted by dramberbrooks

Many children with autism have low cholesterol and this has been brought to the forefront for some time now. A researcher at Johns Hopkins found that some of the behaviors that children with autism exhibit are in fact due to a genetic disorder called Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) and can be fixed with supplementation of cholesterol.


Keeping Our Kids Safe and Medication Free

submitted by dramberbrooks

It always startles me to see children being overly prescribed antibiotics this time of year. When you have a child with autism or some other special need sometimes it is hard to tell if they even have an infection because they do not tell you or cannot tell you. Their doctors choose to give a medication “just in case there is an infection” but nobody stops to think what this is doing to their body long-term. Many children, whether diagnosed on the spectrum or not have horrible immune systems.


Immune Disorders and Autism: Is this a root cause?

submitted by dramberbrooks

Most families have done enough research or attended enough conferences to realize that autism is not a shear genetic issue, although the Wall Street Journal recently did a story about the genetic link. The NY Times did a story about immune disorders and their link to autism in August 2012. A larger number of children are found to have inflammatory issues beginning in infancy and continuing on throughout development yielding the results of a diagnosis later.


Early Development of Celiac: What Children Are At Risk?

submitted by dramberbrooks

In the past many doctors have suggested exposing an infant to gluten if they were at risk for developing celiac disease. These children “at risk” are those that have parents or siblings with the condition. I have never condoned this practice but new research backs up that this early introduction is a bad idea. The University of Maryland said “there may be a benefit to delayed exposure, waiting until at least 12 months of age.” This new information comes after looking at the intestines of 26 at-risk infants exposed to gluten early VS late.


Anesthesia and Children: How does this affect development?

submitted by dramberbrooks

We all hope the children we love never have to endure surgery and that they are perfectly healthy but what happens when this comes up? As a parent perhaps you have run to your doctor for advice about anesthesia, whether your child must undergo dental work or something very serious it is important to know and understand the implications of the drugs used. This is especially a concern for those children on the autism spectrum or with developmental delays.


Heavy Metals & Children

submitted by dramberbrooks

Many have read or heard about the damage heavy metals can do to a developing child’s mind and overall health. There are three main ways to test for metals and each is different. It is recommended children with the following symptoms or diagnosis get tested.
• Psychosis
• Autism
• Depression
• Chronic fatigue
• Sleep disorders
• Anxiety
• ADD/ADHD
• Mood swings
• Digestive disorders
• Anemia


Creating Independence In Your Teen With ASD

submitted by dramberbrooks

There seems to be so many answers and guidance when your child with an ASD is younger but as they age its scary because the support dwindles away. I read a great article in Autism Digest by Chantal Sicile-Kira about creating Independence and want to share some of my favorite highlights.
The first is self-regulation- this is something that is taught and does not always come easy to a child on the spectrum. Some key points to remember in developing this skill:


10 procedures to think twice about & 10 things you want to do during pregnancy

submitted by dramberbrooks

Many parents worry about what to do differently when they get pregnant again, especially those that have had a child with special needs. Consumer reports put out this list of things and I wanted to share it with you this month. Mothers here in the US are confused and do not have the resources they need to make decisions sometimes.


Sensory Cravings

submitted by dramberbrooks

Most parents, even those that are unaware, struggle with sensory issues if they have a child on the spectrum. A sensory craver is one that looks for sensory input, craving the sensation it gives them. As a result behaviors may ensue that are less than obvious to parents. I wanted to give a short red flag list I read for parents to refer to, in hopes this may help you identify needs your children have and get help.
Visual: likes flashing lights, spinning objects, prefers TV/video games
Auditory: uses loud voice, makes background noises, and enjoys noisy places


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