About pLDNetworks

DrNaseef's blog

Father’s Day 2013: What’s a man to do about a problem he can’t fix? by Robert Naseef, Ph.D.

submitted by DrNaseef

Becoming a father for the first time in 1979 was a life-altering experience. Those first smiles, first steps, and first words seemed magical. Then at 18 months, my son stopped talking, began flapping his arms, and fussing.


Autism Awareness and Acceptance 2013 by Robert Naseef, Ph.D.

submitted by DrNaseef

On Monday, March 25, I was part of “Voices in the Family” a public radio show with host Dan Gottlieb. Eustacia Cutler also lent her voice to the discussion. Eustacia is the mother of Temple Grandin, a well-known adult with autism, an author and speaker. Dan has been living with quadriplegia for 33 years, and I have a 33 year old adult son with autism.


Autism in the Family: Getting the Big Picture

submitted by DrNaseef

I became a typical father in 1979. It was a dream come true—those magical first smiles, first steps, first words. Then in 1981, my son stopped talking, stopped playing normally, and began flapping his arms. From those first red flags of autism until now, I have not stopped experiencing autism and the family—the central theme of my life and work—counseling, teaching, and writing about the impact of autism on families.


From Appreciation to Conversation

submitted by DrNaseef

On November 3, 2012, the Lancaster County Autism Mommies, The Tommy Foundation, and Autism Spectrum Connections sponsored a parent workshop which I facilitated about taking care of your marriage while raising a child on the autism spectrum. Everyone present, myself included, learned how appreciating your partner can lead to necessary conversations that have been difficult to impossible to have.


Just Appreciate Me

submitted by DrNaseef

They've been standing on the brink of divorce. For seven years, they had devoted themselves tirelessly to their son with autism. They were worn out; all the joy had left their lives despite their son having made dramatic progress. Their boy was included in a regular class with supports; something they never dreamed of.


Denial Versus Get Out of My Way: A Couples’ Struggle by Robert Naseef, Ph.D.

submitted by DrNaseef

On October 11, 2012, at the Autism New Jersey Annual Conference, Rodney Peete spoke candidly to 1000 of us present about how he was in denial after the diagnosis of his son RJ with autism. His wife, Holly Robinson Peete, quickly countered by saying "I was on Get Out of My Way Avenue!" She didn't have time to wait for him. Having a child is special needs clearly impacted them just like many other couples. It was inspiring to hear them talk about working through this and saving their marriage.


Revisiting Masculinity: The father’s journey with autism by Robert Naseef, Ph.D.

submitted by DrNaseef

When my son was born in November 1979, I jumped for joy. When he was diagnosed with autism 4 years later, I thought my head was going to explode. I couldn’t get the word autism out of my mouth for months.


I yelled! Am I a bad parent? by Robert Naseef, Ph.D.

submitted by DrNaseef

Parents frequently confide to me when they have lost their patience. Fathers as well as mothers share their guilt and their heartbreak when this occurs. As one mother said to me recently, "My mother yelled at us, and I vowed to never yell at my children. Now I'm becoming a yeller. What's wrong?"


Mothers Day Hints for Men by Robert Naseef, Ph.D.

submitted by DrNaseef

Why is it so hard for moms to take a break? What can fathers do to help?
First of all, struggling with taking a break from maternal responsibilities is normal. This is hard for the mothers of typical children—who presumably have a little less to be preoccupied about than mothers of children who have autism and other special needs.


Helping Fathers Bond with their Children with Autism

submitted by DrNaseef

With men, there is often an awkward pause before they can find the words to speak. Not about sports—that’s usually easy—but about what it is like to be doing their best to face autism with no “fix,” no exit, just life-altering challenges. Then they share their struggles and what they are learning about how to relate to their children and families. This is some of the work I do as a psychologist who happens to also be the father of an adult child with autism.


Syndicate content